Minneapolis

MINNEAPOLIS. White House cuts to federal grants endanger sex education for teens (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

By Judy Keen

Founded 46 years ago by faith leaders, Annex Teen Clinic provided sexual health services to 1,782 youth in 2016. It takes its message to public schools, contributing to a dramatic drop in Hennepin County’s teen birthrate. Annex installs health mentors in some schools to work one-on-one with students and provides training for teachers and parents, in addition to its clinical services.

Now some of the clinic’s programs and jobs, and other Hennepin County efforts to prevent teen pregnancy, are at risk. President Donald Trump’s administration in July announced an abrupt end — two years early — to what were supposed to be five-year grants specifically aimed at preventing teen pregnancy.

In all, the U.S. Health and Human Services Department notified 81 programs in 31 states and the District of Columbia that $214 million in funding will end June 30, 2018, instead of in 2020.

Officials here and across the country are fighting to save the grants, but worry that the Republican-controlled Congress will not restore funding. Hennepin County Commissioner Mike Opat said he’ll urge the county to fill the gap if its appeal fails...

Efforts to reverse the grants’ demise have spread across the country. Health officials from 20 U.S. cities have written to HHS Secretary Tom Price to denounce the grants’ elimination. Minnesota Reps. Keith Ellison, Betty McCollum and Tim Walz are among 148 House Democrats who sent a July 25 letter to Price demanding an explanation within 45 days for the decision, which came just three months after Congress voted to provide full funding for the latest grants.

“At a time when young people are most in need of information and education to protect their sexual and reproductive health, this administration is denying evidence and science,” the legislators wrote.

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MINNEAPOLIS. Repeal of ACA would imperil a little-known part with a huge impact (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

By GRETCHEN MUSICANT
February 17, 2017

The debate about the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is in full swing, and many know that repealing the ACA would leave almost 20 million Americans without health care coverage. This is of great concern.

But the fact that repealing the law would also decimate the already-fragile public health system in America is not known to many policymakers or members of the public.

This part of the law, which benefits every American, helps to keep all healthy and safe; it will essentially be undone with the repeal of the ACA. If there is no comparable replacement, communities across the nation are poised to lose $3 billion in federal funds over the next five years through a mechanism called the Prevention and Public Health Fund, which is currently a component of the ACA.

The Prevention and Public Health Fund was designed as an important, complementary component to the promise of insurance coverage for most Americans. It was meant to help us prevent disease instead of just treating it when it strikes, and to address many of the other factors that make us ill and cause our health care costs to keep rising.

Researchers have found that our ZIP code is actually a greater predictor of our health than our genetic code. Strategies supported by the fund are aimed at addressing our nation’s sky-high rate of chronic disease, in particular diabetes, obesity, cancer, asthma, and heart disease. These health problems now touch almost every family in every community.

The resources that flow from the ACA are now being used to backfill funding cuts to support core public health programs by funding a large portion of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the part of the federal government that works 24/7 to protect America from health, safety and security threats. It is responsible for ensuring access to vaccines to protect against flu and other diseases; supporting local and state first responders in mitigating the effects of outbreaks like Zika or Ebola; and preparing for and responding to natural disasters like hurricanes and earthquakes. The CDC works to protect every American, every single day. Without the funding provided by the Affordable Care Act, its reach will be dramatically reduced.

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