CHICAGO. Chicago health commissioner: The ACA saves lives and we shouldn't abandon it (The Hill)

Op-ed by Julie Morita, Commissioner, Chicago Department of Public Health

For many people, the signature accomplishment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the 20 million additional Americans that gained access to health insurance.

But what is less recognized is the ACA's transformation of the entire health system. These changes included a sharper focus on preventive care, a departure from the fee for service payment models that incentivize procedures, and the adoption of payment to quality, not quantity, of care.

While we are hopeful that much of this remains in place regardless of what the future of ACA looks like, one key lever must be retained to continue the progress made toward prevention of many serious and costly diseases: the Prevention and Public Health Fund (PPHF).

This fund directs federal dollars to state and local public health agencies to conduct vital prevention initiatives ranging from preventing lead poisoning in homes, to detecting and controlling infectious disease outbreaks before they can spread.

These funds have played a critical role in combating a little recognized public health threat known as Human Papillomavirus (HPV) here in Chicago. Guided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), our nation’s leading public health agency, recommendation that young girls and boys receive the first dose of the life-saving, cancer-preventing HPV vaccine at age eleven, Chicago has taken steps to protect our children from HPV-induced cancers. And we could not have done it without the PPHF funding that we received in 2013. Read more.